Eco-Friendly Septic Solutions with the Biodigester Tank

The water produced by the anaerobic digestion process is not suitable for drinking (unless further processed), but it can be used for irrigation or recycled back into the system to flush toilets. The entire process is also free from unpleasant odors due to the use of an anaerobic tank (meaning no oxygen is present).

Bio digester toilets are systems that safely dispose of human solid waste by converting it into organic manure. These toilets address liquid and solid waste treatment issues at various facilities, including residential, commercial, community, and public facilities.

Bio digester toilets are different from septic tanks, cesspit tanks, and manholes, which require periodic emptying.

These toilets work by eliminating odors associated with toilet waste water through the use of bacteria.

In biofil digesters, waste water is filtered through a porous slab and then leaches into the soil through a rock-filled soak hole. The solid waste is decomposed and converted into safe soil for easy disposal, while the liquid waste is filtered and drained into the soil for further decomposition.

The final effluent produced is a clear, odorless liquid that can be discharged into a waste watercourse or through a customized soak hole trench or drain filled system.

 The construction of a soak hole for bio digester toilets involves creating a layer of large rocks at the bottom of the hole and ensuring that the depth of the soak hole is appropriate for the specific site. The soak hole should also be surrounded by a layer of smaller rocks to prevent erosion and assist with drainage.

How Does Biodigester Tank Work

Biodigesters are waste management systems that use anaerobic digestion to break down and dispose of human waste. They typically have three chambers that treat the waste without the need for cleaning or emptying.

When the toilet is flushed, the waste is deposited in the first chamber, where solid material settles to the bottom and is broken down by anaerobic bacteria cultures. The liquids then flow into the second chamber, where the process is repeated with less solid matter.

By the time the waste reaches the third chamber, any harmful pathogens have been removed and the process has created gasses that are released without causing environmental damage.

The water produced by the anaerobic digestion process is not suitable for drinking but can be used for irrigation or recycled back into the system. Since biodigesters operate in an anaerobic (oxygen-free) environment, the process is free from odors.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *